Katong, Meishupian, and Donghua: On Terms of Chinese Animation

By Daisy Yan Du American animated films, such as the Out of the Inkwell series (1918-1929), were first introduced to Shanghai around the late 1910s and early 1920s, at a time when warlords had plunged China into wars and chaos. Usually screened before a live-action film, animated films were often called moving shadow plays (huodong … Continue reading Katong, Meishupian, and Donghua: On Terms of Chinese Animation

On the Future of Cartoons (Eileen Chang, 1937)

By Eileen Chang; translated by Panpan Yang The word “cartoon” has a history of less than ten years in China. However, probably all moviegoers know Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse. “Cartoon” originally referred to all single-panel satirical comics, newsreel comics, life comics, serial comics and so on, but the kind of cartoon I want to talk … Continue reading On the Future of Cartoons (Eileen Chang, 1937)

Towards a Eurasian Model of Animated Filmmaking

By Rolf Giesen The Cartoon Forum is a yearly event organized by Cartoon Brussels that brings together TV animation producers from all over Europe to Toulouse, France. Although you will see a variety of incredible work at the Cartoon Forum, the sad truth is that TV is no longer the partner for animation it once … Continue reading Towards a Eurasian Model of Animated Filmmaking

Compositing Japanese Imperialism in Two Chinese Animated Features: A Jewish Girl in Shanghai and Xi Bai Po 2: Wang Er Xiao

Download PDF By Sean Metzger Many years ago, I published an article on Disney’s Mulan (1998), of which I am frequently reminded by the warblers on UCLA’s campus. A mainstay of karaoke events in the residence halls, the music of Mulan continues to serve as a reference point for many US-based youth. I overhear excerpts … Continue reading Compositing Japanese Imperialism in Two Chinese Animated Features: A Jewish Girl in Shanghai and Xi Bai Po 2: Wang Er Xiao