Journey to the Best: A Journey through Law and Policy for a Flourishing Chinese Animation Industry

By Adela Hurtado It was Fall 2016, and I was studying law for a semester in Shanghai at the East China University of Political Science and Law (“ECUPL”) when I first became interested in Chinese animation. I had loved China itself since I was a child after reading “Romance of the Three Kingdoms” in the … Continue reading Journey to the Best: A Journey through Law and Policy for a Flourishing Chinese Animation Industry

Hauntological Aesthetics in Taiwanese Animation Feature Grandma and Her Ghosts (1998)

By Li Guo In her recently published monograph Puppets, Gods, and Brands: Theorizing the Age of Animation from Taiwan, Teri Silvio insightfully observes that for the author, the animation model could also be utilized to display “how specific local cultural traditions make sense of and contribute to global transformations.”[1] Further, Silvio observes that “recent transformations … Continue reading Hauntological Aesthetics in Taiwanese Animation Feature Grandma and Her Ghosts (1998)

An Overview of Animation Studies in Mainland China, 1949-2020

By CHEN Yishui; adapted by Yixing Li While Chinese animation originated in the 1920s and had an early impact on world animation, animation studies in mainland China remained rudimentary until the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. The field developed steadily after the Reform and Opening-up and has made significant progress in … Continue reading An Overview of Animation Studies in Mainland China, 1949-2020

Narratological Analysis of Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!

By Nick Stember Published in May 1980 by the Shanghai Fine Arts Press, Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!is a 46 page long, full color lianhuanhua (linked pictures) with an initial print run of 400,000. While traditional narratological analysis (as exemplified by Vladimir Propp) is perhaps difficult to apply to this story given the distinct cultural … Continue reading Narratological Analysis of Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!

Can We Talk about the Rejuvenation of Chinese Animation?

By Weihua Wu Mainland China has been enjoying a renewed appreciation for animation—one that links cyberspace with the box-office, and that extends far beyond the categories of children’s “donghua” or “meishu film.” The problems encountered by Chinese animation during the past 30 years has been the unnegotiated conflicts between the marketization of Chinese animation filmmaking and … Continue reading Can We Talk about the Rejuvenation of Chinese Animation?

Hong Kong Animation History Revisited

By Winnie Fu Hong Kong animation has a unique path of development, which contributed to its scattered but significant achievements in the past 50-odd years. Its multifaceted developments are linked to the dedication—even obsession—of a group of motivated animators who had successfully created world-acclaimed productions and continue to add to Hong Kong’s list of missions … Continue reading Hong Kong Animation History Revisited

Katong, Meishupian, and Donghua: On Terms of Chinese Animation

By Daisy Yan Du American animated films, such as the Out of the Inkwell series (1918-1929), were first introduced to Shanghai around the late 1910s and early 1920s, at a time when warlords had plunged China into wars and chaos. Usually screened before a live-action film, animated films were often called moving shadow plays (huodong … Continue reading Katong, Meishupian, and Donghua: On Terms of Chinese Animation